Facebook revamps terms of service

Facebook revamps terms of service to explain how it profits

Embattled social media giant Facebook updated its terms of service on Thursday amid ongoing scrutiny from regulators in the U.S. and Europe regarding its business practices. The updates provided further insight intot how Facebook profits from advertising, how it determines whether to remove content over potential terms of service violations, the intellectual property rights users have over their photos and videos and how the platform handles content that has been deleted. Facebook said reworked terms of service do not change any of its existing practices or policies. “People should have clear, simple explanations of how online services work and use personal information,” Facebook vice president and general counsel Anna Benckert said in a blog post, adding that the updates were meant to “clarify how Facebook makes money and better explain the rights people have when using our services.” The changes stem from Facebook’s efforts to assuage the concerns of European regulators in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, during which the platform disclosed that a British data firm had improperly accessed personal information of at least 87 million users. Facing pressure from the European Commission, Facebook agreed in April to alter its terms and conditions to explain how it profits from targeted advertisements. Facebook also faces potential antitrust scrutiny from U.S. regulators. The Federal Trade Commission was reportedly granted jurisdiction in June to review Facebook’s business for anti-competitive practices. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has faced unprecedented scrutiny in recent months over the company’s handling of various issues, including its role in inadvertently facilitating foreign interference in the election process. Speaking at the 2019 Aspen Ideas Festival, Zuckerberg spoke in support of federal regulation of the tech industry as a means of addressing the public’s concerns, but pushed back against the notion that antitrust scrutiny would solve lingering issues. “It’s not the case that if you broke up Facebook into a bunch of pieces you suddenly wouldn’t have those issues. You would have those issues, you would just be much less equipped to deal with them,” Zuckerberg said. The social media giant’s recent unveiling of its cryptocurrency, Libra, exacerbated concerns about its business practices. Within days of the announcement, the House Financial Services Committee and the Senate Banking Committee set hearings to discuss the currency’s potential implications.

How to Find Old Tweets By Time Period, Keyword, And More

How to Find Old Tweets By Time Period, Keyword, And More

Looking at old social media posts is an easy way to get a quick snapshot of what was going on in your life during a certain time period. I’m personally a sucker for those “On this day” posts. While occasionally traumatic (thanks for the reminder of my mom’s funeral, Facebook!), by in large I like seeing pictures of vacations past, my dog when he was a puppy, and fun nights out with friends I don’t see nearly enough of anymore. When it comes to Twitter, surfacing your older tweets can be a bit difficult. Yes, you can scroll back through your timeline, but if you’ve used the service for more than a few years that could mean scrolling through hundreds if not thousands of tweets. As The Next Web posted this week, Twitter’s Advanced Search tool is your friend in this case. With it, you can search your personal account by time period, or search for specific keywords tweeted by you or anyone else you choose. For instance, if you want to figure out how many times your friend John has mentioned pie in tweets, this is the place. To get started, log into your Twitter account and go here. From there, enter the search terms you’d like. You can search for words, exact phrases, and hashtags by a specific time period. You can also look for just tweets by you, or search for tweets from other accounts or those that mention other accounts. It’s all super easy and can make the process of finding that tweet (or tweets) you’re looking for going much faster. FCE Keyword Transformation- Sentence Transformation -Elementary Level Exercise This worksheet includes 32 Elementary& Pre Intermediate Level FCE Keyword Transformation sentences. Grammar points are Wh Questions, Present Simple and Past Simple, Object and Subject Pronouns, Adverbs of Frequency, Enough& Too, Prepositions of Locations. Google is giving SME retailers a better chance against Amazon, keyword search research discovers Searching out SMEs: is Google now making it easier to discover smaller businesses? New research reveals that Google is now giving smaller retailers a greater chance of appearing in organic search results that used to be dominated by big brands such as Amazon. The study by search and content optimization platform Searchmetrics analyzed the impact of Google’s recent diversity update that was designed to reduce the instances of the same brand appearing multiple times¹ in the top organic search results. Comparing Google results from before and after the diversity update – which happened in early June – the analysis suggests that you are now around half as likely to see the same brand/website appearing three times in the first ten ranking positions. Three listings from the same website now appear for just 3.5% of searches, a drop of almost half from 6.7%. Keywords that trigger more than three appearances from the same website in the top ten results are now effectively zero, down from 1.8%. Overall, the data indicates that transactional searches – those where the searcher’s intent is to make a purchase – are most likely to have been affected by the Google diversity update. So Google is now offering shoppers more choices on the first search results page. This could mean that big brands such as Amazon may now put a little more emphasis on paid listings, suggests Searchmetrics on its blog: “If the big brands are now restricted to fewer unpaid (maximum of two) organic results on the first page of Google, then one way to ensure more top-of-SERP presence will be investment in AdWords or Product Listing Ads, which Google obviously won’t mind at all.” Interestingly, Google stated that the diversity update only impacts traditional organic search results (the blue links). SERP Features, such as maps, images and video carousels which Google now regularly integrates into search results aren’t affected. So affected websites that find they now only have two organic listings in the top search results can try and target SERP Features such as images and videos to increase their visibility. In its blog post, Searchmetrics quotes an example of how the diversity update has impacted Amazon’s search visibility for the term “nutcrackers”. Since the update, Google is now showing only two organic results from amazon.com on the first page, compared with three before. But the search engine is now displaying an image box above the third-placed organic result – and Amazon owns three of these images. Video carousels are even more interesting according to Searchmetrics. The vast majority of results in video carousels belong to YouTube.com, meaning that YouTube is uniquely placed to maintain its presence in the Google SERPs. While other big brand domains have often lost their third (organic) ranking in the search results, YouTube’s video rankings are not affected. The Searchmetrics study analyzed the top ten search results for 10,000 keywords on Google.com before and after the diversity update (comparing results from March 31, 2019, against June 23, 2019).